Lastest News

Using the common cold virus as a naturally occurring vaccine to prevent COVID-19

Using the common cold virus as a naturally occurring vaccine to prevent COVID-19

By Healthy Life Foundation in Lastest News on 16 October 2020

New research from the lead scientific advisor of the Healthy Life Foundation, Michael Lisanti and his team at Salford University.

Three recent papers published in Nature, Science and Cell, all present clear evidence that there is cross-reactive T-cell immunity between human coronaviruses (229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1), linked with the common cold, and SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19. Can we use this information to design and build a new vaccine based on the less pathogenic, common cold coronaviruses, for the prevention of COVID-19? If we look at the history of medicine and vaccine development, from the point of view of Edward Jenner, the answer just might be yes.

Click on the link below to read the full article:

https://www.aging-us.com/article/5f85b99ce798ca0008c1366a/text

Metastasis prevention using Doxycycline is the new weapon in the war on Cancer

Metastasis prevention using Doxycycline is the new weapon in the war on Cancer

By Healthy Life Foundation in Lastest News on 28 September 2020

Lead Scientific Advisors of the Healthy Life Foundation, Professor Michael Lisanti and Professor Federica Sotgia have made a discovery that could turn cancer into a treatable disease and remove the fear from a cancer diagnosis.

Despite years of research and billions of pounds of investment, there are no MHRA/FDA-approved drugs for the prevention of metastasis. As a consequence, cancer metastasis remains a mysterious, untreatable, lethal disease.

What is cancer metastasis? Metastasis is what happens when cancer cells spread throughout the body, most often to other organs. Metastasis, more often than not, turns cancer into a terminal disease. 

Professor Michael Lisanti and Professor Federica Sotgia, who both work in Translational Medicine at The University of Salford, have designed and tested new inhibitors of cancer metastasis that are based on an existing FDA-approved antibiotic, namely Doxycycline. This breakthrough could ultimately change clinical practice, by adding metastasis prevention, as a new, more effective, weapon in the war on cancer. “

To read the full paper published in Frontiers in Oncology, click here:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc.2020.01528/full

RESEARCH IDENTIFIES NEW APPROACH TO STOPPING THE SPREAD OF CANCER

RESEARCH IDENTIFIES NEW APPROACH TO STOPPING THE SPREAD OF CANCER

By Healthy Life Foundation in Lastest News on 3 July 2020

New Research conducted at the Translational Medicine Laboratory at the University of Salford. Led by Professor Michael P. Lisanti, MD-PhD, Chair of Translational Medicine and lead scientific advisor of the Healthy Life Foundation.

It is not possible to guarantee that once cancer patients have completed treatment, that the cancer will never come back, or “recur”. Outcomes of recurrence are particularly found in patients with metastatic cancers – cancers that have spread around the body. Unfortunately, around 90% of cancer patients die from metastasis. 

As treatment of metastatic cancer is incredibly difficult or costly, attention naturally turns to prevention, which is poorly understood, and there are currently no known MHRA or FDA-approved drugs that can be used for the prevention of metastasis. 

The medical community recognise that the growth of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is one of the underlying causes of tumour recurrence, cancer spread, and treatment failure, across different cancer types. Research conducted at the Translational Medicine Laboratory at the University of Salford, has identified five new drug candidates, that effectively inhibit metastasis involving CSCs, in pre-clinical models of human breast cancer, with little or no toxicity. This new approach identified by researchers at the University paves the way for studies leading to a new way to treat cancer patients, allowing for metastasis prevention or prophylaxis. 

Most existing chemotherapeutic agents inhibit tumour growth, but not metastasis. The drugs identified here as part of the research inhibit metastasis, having little or no effect on tumour growth. This shows that metastasis is a fundamentally different process than tumour growth. 

Professor Michael P. Lisanti, MD-PhD, Chair of Translational Medicine, said: “Our pre-clinical research looked at five mitochondrial inhibitors that were found to have minor or no effect on tumour formation, but had notable effects such as the potent inhibition of tumour cell metastasis. This research shows that mitochondrial inhibitors could be employed to develop new treatment protocols, for clinically providing metastasis prophylaxis, to help prevent poor outcomes in cancer patients.”

The research was co-authored by Dr. Bela Ozsvari, Professor Federica Sotgia and Professor Michael P. Lisanti and was published in the biomedical journal Aging. The paper identifies that in cancer models novel mitochondrial inhibitors prevent metastasis and have the potential to be used as a new strategy for cancer therapy, with very limited toxicity. 

https://beta.salford.ac.uk/news/research-identifies-new-approach-stopping-spread-cancer-metastasis-prophylaxis